Archives

The Brazilian Connection

In early 2000, WSCC agreed to produce a distant-learning, chiropractic curriculum for export to the University of Anhembi Morumbi (UAM) in Brazil. The UAM Chiropractic Program remains one of the most successful chiropractic programs in Latin America to-date.

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Portland Permit

After more than 100 meetings over the span of 10 years and a permitting process that took an equal number of years to complete, the college was finally granted a limited use permit by the City of Portland in February 1998.

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Accreditation

“NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Commission on Accreditation hereby grants Western States Chiropractic College Accredited status for a period of three years…”

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Anti-Trust Lawsuit Victory

The chiropractic profession won its anti-trust lawsuit against the American Medical Association after 11 years of legal battles. A federal appellate court judge ruled the AMA had conspired to eliminate the chiropractic profession as a competitor in the U.S. health care system.

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Federal Grant

Dr. Joanne Nyiendo, WSCC Director of Research, applied for a Health Career Opportunities Program grant through the U.S. Department of Education to support three consecutive summer education programs for 12 Native Americans interested in pursuing a chiropractic career. WSCC was awarded a $250,000 grant, the first federally-funded grant ever awarded to a chiropractic college.

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WBCE Recognition

In March 1976, the college received official recognition from the Washington Board of Chiropractic Examiners. Finally, this would allow WSCC graduates to sit for licensure in that jurisdiction.

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New Philosophy

In November 1975, a document entitled: “Philosophy of Western States Chiropractic College” was drafted and adopted by the college. The document stated: “The philosophy…is to inspire the will to serve rather than the will to get, to create goodness rather than goods…expand from the capacity to make a living to the broader capacity to make a life.”

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New Library

In March 1975, WSCC purchased an entire medical library from United Medical Laboratories. The library contained the full complement of basic science reference books, professional journals and scientific periodicals recommended by the Carnegie Institute for colleges and universities.

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Marycrest Campus

On December 15, 1972, the WSCC board voted unanimously to make an offer to the Sisters of St. Dominic Convent for the purchase of Marycrest School. An offer was tendered the following week and accepted almost immediately by the Sisters.

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Revolt and Expulsion

In May 1972, the faculty voted to expel four students – all members of the new student ICA club — for fomenting significant discontent on campus. After review, the faculty agreed to allow three of the four students to return to the college, if they were placed on behavioral probation for two years.

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Journey to Accreditation

In January 1971, the college finally enjoyed a significant, albeit small, victory in its pursuit of accreditation. The Council on Education recognized WSCC under a newly created accreditation status, Correspondent.

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Conditional Accreditation

In July 1963, WSC was notified by the Committee on Accreditation (COA) that the college was in danger of losing its accreditation because of low enrollment and limited financial resources. The letter informed the college that its status was being downgraded from “provisional accreditation” to “conditional accreditation.”

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Dr. Robert Elliot

In July 1956, the HRF Board of Trustees appointed Dr. Robert Elliot as president of Western States College. Dr. Elliot, a 1948 graduate of WSC, had served on the Oregon Board of Chiropractic Examiners while maintaining an active practice in Portland.

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Dr. Failor

Dr. Failor became the leader of the college on December 15, 1954. Dr. Failor, he unknowingly accepted the leadership position at the beginning of one of the most troubling periods in the college’s history. The deluge of post-war students that created the boom period dried-up overnight, leaving the college to face almost insurmountable financial difficulties

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Milton I. Higgens

The passing of Dr. Alfred Budden left the college without a leader. Fortunately, the Health Research Foundation had Dr. Milton I. Higgens at the helm. Responsibility for running the college fell to Dr. Higgens. Without hesitation, Higgens took on the responsibility of overseeing the college, making command decisions with the confidence of a seasoned leader.

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Appa Anderson D.C.

On September 1, 1951, Appa Anderson, DC, DACBR joined the WSC faculty. She was the first woman chiropractic radiologist and the cornerstone upon which WSC built its instruction of radiology. Her tenure at the college would span 38 years, becoming one of the most respected and revered members of the WSCC community.

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WSC Tax-Exempt Status

On April 25, 1950, the Internal Revenue Service notified Western States College that the disagreement between the two parties over WSC’s tax-exempt status had been resolved.  In its letter, the IRS conceded that Western States had a legitimate claim for tax-exempt status. However, the IRS would only extend that status retroactively to January 1, 1949.

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Oregon State Senate Bill 287

Despite the remarkable recovery and growth experienced by Western States in 1947, it came at a time when the chiropractic profession was under attack. In early 1947, Oregon State Senate Bill 287 was introduced to the legislature by a group of 20 chiropractors. If passed, the bill would severely restrict the practice of chiropractic, eliminating the practice of minor surgery, obstetrics and other aspects of the broad scope of chiropractic practice in Oregon.

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The GI Bill

The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, more commonly known as the G.I. Bill, was signed into law by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1944. It provided funding for college education or vocational training to returning WWII veterans. 

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Health Research Foundation

On October 4, 1937, while the NCA’s Committee on Educational Standards was meeting to compare the curricula of 37 chiropractic colleges against a set of educational standards, Alfred Budden, Ross H. Elliott and attorney, Elam Amstutz, submitted Articles of Incorporation for the Health Research Foundation (HRF)

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New Education Standards

In 1935, the House of Delegates of the National Chiropractic Association (NCA), forerunner of the American Chiropractic Association, appointed a Committee on Educational Standards (CES). The charge of the committee was to conduct a thorough evaluation of the curricula offered at the 37 chiropractic colleges operating at that time

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The Great Depression

The board considered filing for bankruptcy, but instead, chose to “…endeavor to liquidate its debt, if possible.” The board decided to suspend active business, while maintaining a skeleton organization to manage accounts receivable and payment of debt.

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W.A. Budden

Lenore Elliott signed documents transferring all legal responsibility and authority for Pacific Chiropractic College to W. A. Budden. Dr. Budden would shepherd in a new era in chiropractic education that would help reshape the entire chiropractic profession.

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The Marsh School

Doctors John E. and Eva Marsh are credited with being the first to establish a chiropractic school in Portland, Oregon, known as the Marsh School and Cure. The Marsh School would eventually become the University of Western States.

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A New Location

By 1919, Elliott had moved the campus to SW Park and Yamhill and had expanded the DC curriculum to 3,400 hours; 1,000 hours more than was required by Oregon State law.

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Out of Many, One

In 1913, LaValley approached William Powell with a proposal that their two colleges merge. LaValley agreed to have his college absorbed by the Pacific College of Chiropractic. PCC retained its name, Powell remained president, and LaValley became a member of the faculty.

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John LaValley

After D.D. Palmer left the D.D. Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1910, LaValley reorganized the institution under a new name: the Oregon Peerless College of Chiropractic-Neuropathy, where he offered a Doctor of Chiropractic-Neuropathy or DC-N degree.

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Early Battles

Marsh asked William O. Powell to join him at the school while they lobbied the Oregon Legislature to establish chiropractic as a recognized profession. They were able to insert an exemption into a medical bill before the Oregon Legislature that would have banned the chiropractic profession.

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